THE 39 COUNTIES

 

Click on the name of the county you'd like to learn more about.

Adams County
Adams County's Web Site
16th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Ritzville

county map Adams County, a land of broad wheat fields and irrigated plains, is located in southeastern Washington. It was named in honor of President John Adams and created by act of the Washington Territorial Legislature on November 28, 1883. Back to Top

Asotin County
Asotin County's Web Site
35th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Asotin

county map Asotin County, a land of wheat fields, highland pastures and forested mountains, is located in the southeastern corner of Washington. The name "Asotin" is a
Nez Pierce tribe word meaning "Eel Creek." The county was created by act of
the Washington Territorial Legislature on October 27, 1883. 
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Benton County
Benton County's Web Site
21st Largest County by Area - County Seat: Prosser

county map Benton County, a land of Yakima River Valley plains, Columbia River bench lands, and Horse Heaven Hills plateaus, is located in south central Washington.
It was named in honor of Thomas H. Benton, U.S. Senator from Missouri in the 1840's, who was an advocate of far-western development. Benton County was created by the Washington State Legislature on March 8, 1905.
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Chelan County
Chelan County's Web Site
3rd Largest County by Area - County Seat: Wenatchee

county map Chelan County, a land of scenic Cascade Mountains, irrigated valleys and Columbia River terraces, is located in north central Washington. "Chelan" is a Native-American name meaning "deep water", given to a large glacial lake which is a scenic feature. The county was created by the Washington State Legislature on March 13, 1899.
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Clallam County
Clallam County's Web Site
20th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Port Angeles

county map Clallam County, a land of forested Olympic Mountains, Pacific Ocean shores, and river valleys, is located on the northern end of the Olympic Peninsula in northwestern Washington. Klallam, from which the county name is derived, means "strong people." The county was created by the Territorial Legislature on April 26, 1854.
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Clark County
Clark County's Web Site
34th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Vancouver

county map Clark County, with its lower Columbia River bottom and bench lands, and
forested Cascade foothills, is located on the border of southwestern Washington. The county was named after the U.S. Army Officer, Captain William Clark,
whose expedition descended the Columbia River in November 1805. The area
was organized into Clark County by the Oregon Territorial government in 1850.
Early maps from the late 1800's show the spelling of this county as Clarke.
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Columbia County
Columbia County's Web Site
31st Largest County by Area - County Seat: Dayton

county map Columbia County, located in the Blue Mountain region of southeastern Washington, has an agricultural/timber based economy. It was named for the great "River of the West", and was created by act of the Washington Territorial Legislature on November 11, 1875.
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Cowlitz County
Cowlitz County's Web Site
28th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Kelso

county map Cowlitz County is an area of fertile bottom lands and forested Coast and
Cascade Range country in southwestern Washington. The name was adopted from the Native-American Cow e liskee or Cow e liske, meaning river of shifting sands. The area was established as Cowlitz County by the Washington
Territorial Legislature on April 22, 1854.
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Douglas County
Douglas County's Web Site
17th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Waterville

county map Douglas County is located in north central Washington in a dry region generally termed "the Big Bend Country." It was named after Stephen A. Douglas, U.S. Senator and political leader of Illinois. On November 23, 1883, what is now Douglas and Grant Counties was created by the Territorial Legislature as
Douglas County.
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Ferry County
Ferry County's Web Site
9th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Republic

county map Ferry County, land of Okanogan highlands and valleys, borders Canada in the northeastern region of Washington. The county was created by the Washington Legislature on February 21, 1899. The legislative act named the new county in honor of Elisha P. Ferry, the first Governor of the State of Washington.
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Franklin County
Franklin County's Web Site
27th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Pasco

county map Franklin County is an important area of irrigated agriculture and dry land wheat farming located in the southern part of the Columbia Basin of central Washington. Named in honor of Benjamin Franklin, Franklin County was created by act of the Washington Territorial Legislature on November 28, 1883.
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Garfield County
Garfield County's Web Site
33rd Largest County by Area - County Seat: Pomeroy

county map Garfield County is located in the Palouse Hills and Blue Mountains regions of Southeastern Washington. Named in honor of President James A. Garfield, the county was created by act of the Washington Territorial Legislature on November 29, 1881.
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Grant County
Grant County's Web Site
4th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Ephrata

county map Grant County, a land of irrigated plains, coulees, and dry uplands, is located in central Washington. Named in honor of President Ulysses S. Grant, Grant County was created by the State Legislature on February 24, 1909.
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Grays Harbor County
Grays Harbor County's Web Site
15th Largest County by Area - County Seat:  Montesano

county map Grays Harbor County is made up of the Chehalis River Valley, tidewater plains and bays, and the forested uplands of the Coast Range on the Pacific Coast of southwestern Washington. This county was original incorporated as Chehalis County around 1858, then was renamed in 1915 by a legislative act to Grays Harbor County after Captain Robert Gray.
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Island County
Island County's Web Site
38th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Coupeville

county map Island County consists of two major islands in Puget Sound in northwestern Washington. One of the two islands is Whidbey; the other is Camano. Island County was created by the Oregon Territorial Legislature on January 6, 1853.
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Jefferson County
Jefferson County's Web Site
18th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Port Townsend

county map Jefferson County, a land of forested mountains and seashores, is located in the central portion of the Olympic Peninsula in northwestern Washington. American settlers petitioned successfully for a county government and the Oregon
Territorial Legislature proclaimed Jefferson a county December 22, 1852, shortly before Washington Territory was established by Congress in 1853.
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King County
King County's Web Site
12th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Seattle

county map King County a land of Puget Sound shores, lakes, valley lowlands, and forested Cascade Mountains, is located in west central Washington. King County was created by the Oregon Territorial Legislature on December 22, 1852, and named in honor of William R. King, Vice-President of the U.S. from 1852 to 1856.
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Kitsap County
Kitsap County's Web Site
36th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Port Orchard

county map Kitsap County is a forested glacial till plain and a peninsular area located in the center of Puget Sound to the immediate west of Seattle. Two prominent land forms, the Kitsap Peninsula and Bainbridge Island, make up this maritime
county of inlets and islands. Kitsap County, name for Native-American Chief Kitsap (meaning "brave"), was created by the Territorial Legislature on January 16, 1857.
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Kittitas County
Kittitas County's Web Site
7th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Ellensburg

county map Kittitas County, a land of forested Cascade Mountains and upper Yakima River Valley plains, is located in central Washington. Kittitas County was separated from Yakima County on November 24, 1883.
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Klickitat County
Klickitat County's Web Site
14th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Goldendale

county map Klickitat County is located in south-central Washington between the Cascade Mountains and the Horse Heaven Hills. It runs along the Columbia River Gorge bordering Oregon. The county was named after the Klickitat Native-American
tribe and in 1859 became a separate county government.
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Lewis County
Lewis County's Web Site
6th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Chehalis

county map Lewis County, a land of forested Cascade and Coast Range Mountains and Chehalis and Cowlitz River Valley plains, is located in southwestern
Washington. The Oregon Territorial Legislature created Lewis County on December 18, 1845.
Lewis was the first county in WA State to be created.
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Lincoln County
Lincoln County's Web Site
8th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Davenport

county map Lincoln County, a land of broad wheat fields, is located in the Big Bend region
of eastern Washington. Named in honor of President Abraham Lincoln, Lincoln County was created by the Washington Territorial Legislature on November 24, 1883.
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Mason County
Mason County's Web Site
29th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Shelton

county map Mason County is made up of Puget Sound inlets, river valleys, and forested foothills of the Olympic Mountains. In 1854, the Territorial Legislature
established Sawamish County, which was renamed Mason County in 1864.
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Okanogan County
Okanogan County's Web Site
1st Largest County by Area - County Seat: Okanogan

county map Okanogan County, a land of forested highlands and valley farmlands, is located on the Canadian border of north central Washington. The name means "rendezvous" and refers to the place where the Okanogan River joins the Columbia. The Washington Territorial Legislature created Okanogan County on February 2, 1888.
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Pacific County
Pacific County's Web Site
30th Largest County by Area - County Seat: South Bend

county map Pacific County is a land of tidewater plains and bays and Coastal Range hills at the mouth of the Columbia River in southwestern Washington. The county was named after the Pacific Ocean which it borders. Pacific County was established in 1851, being the third county to be created in the present Washington area.
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Pend Oreille County
Pend Oreille County's Web Site
25th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Newport

county map Pend Oreille County, in the Okanogan Highland Valley, is located in the
northeast corner of the state. The county was named by a French trapper who discovered a Native-American tribe in the area wearing dangling earring
pendants, and therefore named it after these devices. Pend Oreille was established as a county on November 11, 1911.
Pend Oreille was the last county in WA State to be created.
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Pierce County
Pierce County's Web Site
24th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Tacoma

county map Pierce County, a land of Puget Sound shores, glaciated plains, and the high Cascades of the Mount Rainier region, is located in western Washington. The Oregon Territorial Legislature created Pierce County December 22, 1852,
shortly before Washington Territory was created by Congress in 1853. It was named in honor of Franklin Pierce, fourteenth President of the United States.

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San Juan County
San Juan County's Web Site
39th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Friday Harbor

county map San Juan County consists of an archipelago of 172 islands in the maritime
waters of northwestern Washington. It was named by Spanish explorers who entered the Strait of Juan de Fuca in 1790, San Juan County was officially established as a separate county by act of the Washington Territorial
Legislature on October 31, 1873.
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Skagit County
Skagit County's Web Site
22nd Largest County by Area - County Seat: Mount Vernon

county map Skagit County, a land of Puget Sound islands, reclaimed tidal lands, wide
valleys, and forested Cascade Mountains, is located in northwestern
Washington. The Washington Territorial Legislature created Skagit County on November 28, 1883. It was named after its most important geographic feature,
the waterway and the wide, fertile valley of the Skagit River.

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Skamania County
Skamania County's Web Site
23rd Largest County by Area - County Seat: Stevenson

county map Skamania County, located in the southwestern portion of the state, lies entirely within the Cascade Mountains and is bordered on the south by the Columbia River Gorge. Skamania a Native-American word meaning "swift river" and refers
to the swift currents of the Columbia River. The county was created on March 5, 1854 by the Washington Territorial Legislature.
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Snohomish County
Snohomish County's Web Site
13th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Everett

county map Snohomish County, land of Puget Sound shores, valley lowlands and forested mountains, is located in northwestern Washington. It was created by the Washington Territorial Legislature on January 14, 1861, and is named for the Snohomish Native-American tribe and the river which bears their name.
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Spokane County
Spokane County's Web Site
19th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Spokane

county map Spokane County, at the center of the "Inland Empire," includes parts of the Spokane Valley plains, Okanogan and Selkirk Highlands, and fertile Palouse
Hills of eastern Washington. The Washington Territorial Legislature first created Spokane County on January 29, 1858, from the northeastern part of Walla Walla County. In 1864, Spokane was reorganized as part of Stevens County. In 1879,
it was re-created again as Spokane County. Spokane, in the language of the Spokane Native-Americans, means "Chief of the Sun." It was derived from a famous chief of the Middle Spokane Tribe, Illim Spokanee.
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Stevens County
Stevens County's Web Site
5th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Colville

county map Stevens County, land of upper Columbia River tributary valleys and forested Okanogan highlands, borders Canada in the northeastern section of Washington. Named in honor of Isaac I. Stevens, first territorial Governor of Washington, Stevens County was created by the Legislature of the Territory on January 20, 1863.
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Thurston County
Thurston County's Web Site
32nd Largest County by Area - County Seat: Olympia

county map Thurston County occupies an area of glacial plains, Coast Range, and Cascade Mountains located at the southern extremity of Puget Sound in western Washington. The Oregon Territorial Legislature created Thurston County on January 12, 1852. It was named in honor of Samuel R. Thurston, first delegate from Oregon Territory to Congress.
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Wahkiakum County
Wahkiakum County's Web Site
37th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Cathlamet

county map Wahkiakum County is a land of forested Coast Range hills and valley bottoms located near the mouth of the Columbia River in southwestern Washington. Wahkiakum means "tall timber" in the Chinook Native-American language. The County of Wahkiakum as a government was created by the Washington
Territorial Legislature on April 25, 1854.
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Walla Walla County
Walla Walla County's Web Site
26th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Walla Walla

county map Walla Walla County is located on the Columbia Plateau and in the Blue
Mountain region of southeastern Washington. Its unusual name comes from the Sahaptin Native-American language and means "a place of many waters." The original boundaries of Walla Walla County, as created in 1854, included all the present counties of Washington east of the Cascades. The present boundaries were created in 1875.

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 Whatcom County
Whatcom County's Web Site
11th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Bellingham

county map Whatcom County, a land of inland seashores, forested mountains, and the
fertile Nooksack Valley, is located on the Canadian border of northwestern Washington. Whatcom County was created by the Washington Territorial Legislature on March 9, 1854. The name is from the Native-American, meaning "noisy waters," given to Whatcom Creek on Bellingham Bay.
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Whitman County
Whitman County's Web Site
10th Largest County by Area - County Seat: Colfax

county map Whitman County, rich land of large wheat fields, is located in the Palouse Hills region of southeastern Washington. The Washington Territorial Legislature created Whitman County on November 29, 1871. It was named in honor of the massacred missionary, Marcus Whitman, who had introduced Christianity to
this portion of Washington.
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Yakima County
Yakima County's Web Site
2nd Largest County by Area - County Seat: Yakima

county map Yakima County, a state and national leader in several farm products, is located
in south central Washington. Named after the Yakima Native-Americans, whose large reservation covers nearly 39 percent of the area, the county lies partly in
the Cascade Range and partly in up folded ridges and a broad irrigated valley of the Columbia Plateau. Yakima, as a name, is from the Native-American word "eyakima" meaning "well fed people." Yakima County was created by the Washington Territorial Legislature on January 21, 1865.
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